: Green Gate Farm : NSW TAFE Riverina Institute : National Environment Center (NEC)

 Green Gate Farm : NSW TAFE Riverina Institute : National Environment Center (NEC)




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Green Gate Organic Farm acknowledge the Wiradjuri people, who are the Traditional Custodians of this Land on which we farm. We recognise their continuing connection to land, water and community and we pay respect to Elders past, present and emerging.

The Sheep

Green Gate Organic Farm has been producing lamb since it was purchased in 1998. We have gone from growing the traditional Merino to Damaras which are a self-shearing breed. 

The Damara is a leaner breed of meat sheep ideally suited to the harsh Australian climate. Damaras originated in East Asia & Egypt and were introduced to Australia from South Africa in 1996.  Also known as African fat-tailed sheep, they store body fat in their tail for use in challenging times. The ewes have strong mothering instincts and are protective of their young. 

The Damara sheep are well suited to this particular Bio-region, well known for it’s poor soils and very hot and dry summers. Our organically run sheep are rotationally grazed every 4 days. This 4 day rotation is guided by the 4 day ‘worm reproduction cycle’.  As we don't chemically drench our sheep for worms, we move the sheep every 4 days to minimise worm burden.  Due to their self-shearing trait, we find them less susceptible to getting fly-blown. Their innate resilience fits well into our Organic ecological system.  

Our grazing paddocks contain a mixture of both native and introduced annual and perennial pastures. Our controlled grazing pressure allows for sufficient surface bio-mass. This remaining bio-mass not only acts as protective mulch for the soil eco-system but also feeds the biology in the soil.

 

With encroaching urban sprawl, our sheep are suseptable to domestic dog attacks.  Our guardian animals, Barbara the Donkey deem dogs as a threat to her mob of sheep and the alpacas keep the mob safe by fending off the foxes.